Waterville Valley Offers Artisan Fair

 

 

WATERVILLE VALLEY – With the beauty of the White Mountains as a backdrop, Waterville Valley invites guests to attend their second annual Resort Artisan Fair event on Saturday, July 18.

 

From 11 a.m. until 5 p.m., local artisans will be set-up around the Town Square and offering wares for sale. Family activities and games will be going on during the event. From 12-3pm there will be free live music from Jimmy and Marcelle on the gazebo stage.

 

Later in the evening, Nobody’s Fault will play on the gazebo stage from 6-9pm. Guests are invited to bring a chair and relax in the Town Square while enjoying the sounds of the eclectic mix of music from many genres firmly based in roots. From uptown to the Delta, London to Nashville, Texas to LA, this band delivers the best of all worlds with talent, finesse, and most of all, soul.

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Booths to be at the Fair;
Ni Designs- Jewelry

Joe Snow Photography- Wildlife photos and prints

Snowshoe Farm- Alpaca yarns and hand knits

Granite State Soap

Gunther's Goodies- Dog/Cat treats

KRM Chocolates

Regenesis Project- Haitian Crafts

Hannas Gifts- Repurposed wool mittens and Granite cheese boards

Rainbo Glass- Stained Glass

 

Waterville Valley, New Hampshire’s family resort, was designed and planned as a self-contained, four-seasons destination in the White Mountain National Forest. Today, in addition to world-class ski area, Waterville Valley Resort has award-winning tennis courts, golf, hiking, biking, lodging, cultural activities and summer theater, an indoor ice rink, boating and a skate park. Dining options include both traditional favorites and elegant eateries. For more information, call 800-468-2553 or visit www.visitwatervillevalley.com.

 


New England’s Newest Hockey Town

 

 

Waterville Valley, NH --Hockey is back.

 

Of course in New England it never really leaves, especially in places like Waterville Valley, NH.

 

The Waterville Valley Ice Arena sees hockey action nearly year round, but the fall season brings the excitement, competition, talent and promise to a whole different level.  

 

Recently the New England Wolves have become a real feature in Waterville Valley, as they are surely on their way to becoming a staple of this resort set in the middle of the White Mountain National Forest.

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The Ice Arena has long been a host to youth hockey tournaments, synchronized figure skating troupes and open public skating. Back in 2011 the arena took on a new resident – the Wolves. This year, as part of  season, the Wolves will make their much-anticipated debut in the Eastern Hockey League (EHL). Additionally, they are joined by the New England Wolves of the AEHL.

 

The emergence of teams and their moving from league to league can get confusing, but to simplify, the Waterville Valley Ice Arena will host two Junior Hockey teams, both consisting of considerable talent.

 

“Now that [the EHL] is in its fourth year, it’s becoming pretty established,” said Waterville Valley Ice Area manager Dan Salzer. “Which means, you’re going to see some top level hockey.”

 

The Wolves aren’t a professional team, they aren’t even a college team; but they are the future of New England collegiate hockey. Since 2012 nearly 30 Wolves alums have either gone on to play, or have committed to play, hockey at a New England college or university.

 

And, while there are higher levels of hockey – those familiar with Junior Hockey can attest to the quality of play. Considering the commitment that is required to play on these teams, it’s no surprise that the on-ice product is top notch.

 

The Wolves, and other teams of the EHL, are made up of athletes between 18 and 20 years old from around the country. But the Wolves fill the majority of their roster with local flair, primarily New England natives. Teams of the EHL are allowed just two international athletes, ensuring that what you see is some of the best that the US has to offer in young talent.

 

“The primary goal here is college hockey,” Salzer said. “While they’re here they live in condos and get a chance to pick up some college credits at Plymouth State University. But playing here helps maintain their college eligibility and gives them an extra year or two of serious hockey.”

 

For the past couple years, Division III hockey has been the final destination of the majority of the Wolves alumni. However, as the teams build their reputation and continue to send a few players off to the likes of University of New Hampshire and University of Maine (as they’ve done recently) the Wolves will see an increase in Division I talent.

 

For the most avid of hockey fans it takes only the sport itself to bring in spectators. As long as the quality of play is there, hockey purists will find their way to games. For those more interested in attending a game because they think they might enjoy the hockey experience, look no further than Waterville Valley.

 

The Ice Arena, which has evolved greatly over the years from the original outdoor rink, has become a part of a reason to take in a hockey game in Waterville Valley, along with the teams themselves. The rink, which is of NHL regulation in size, is set in what looks like a classic red barn. From inside, the rink’s classy finish with an appropriate New England look and feel comes with plenty of seats, great lighting and modern amenities.

 

The arena can hold 250 spectators, who Salzer said not only show up, but really get into the action.

 

“The atmosphere here in the winter is great,” he said. “It’s free admission to all the games so we get some pretty decent crowds. Also, the thing about our rink is the conditions. Fans and people who play hockey can really appreciate just how hard and fast the ice is here.”

 

While the typical hockey fan may not consider ice quality when taking in a game, fans experiencing a Wolves game are afforded the opportunity to do just that.  The Waterville Valley Ice Arena offers daily public skating and frequently offers stick and puck sessions – a perfect opportunity to get a sense of what some of the best young hockey players in the northeast are playing on.

 

With a season lasting from September and carrying on into March, there are plenty of opportunities to make your way up to Waterville Valley to check out the New England Wolves. For schedules and information, visit www.pointstreaksites.com/view/americanhockeyinstitute or contact the Ice Arena at (603) 236-4813 or at info@wvicearean.com.

 

Waterville Valley was designed and planned specifically as a self-contained, four seasons resort. Today in addition to its world-class ski area, Waterville Valley Resort has award-winning tennis courts, golf, hiking, biking, lodging, cultural activities and summer theater, an indoor ice rink, boating, a skate park, and a host of outdoor activities. Dining options include traditional favorites and elegant dining. For more information, call 1-800-GO-VALLEY or visit www.visitwatervillevalley.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Concord, food capital of New Hampshire? You bet!

 

 

Concord, NH -- As you make your foliage sojourns through the Granite State, take a break from artificial apple and pumpkin-flavored foods and stop in Concord, NH, to sample tastes from cultures all around the world. Within the nineteenth-century brick architecture, Downtown Concord hosts a smattering of different international restaurants and bakeries.

 

You can grab lunch or dinner at the House of India, a family owned and operated Indian restaurant. You can dine on authentic Indian cuisine that is prepared by the matriarch of the Kaur family. The restaurant itself is homey and the quality, authenticity, and taste of the food is unparalleled in the state. Prices for dinner entrées range from $8-15.

 

The chefs at Siam Orchid are guided by family recipes passed down through generations. Located in a newly renovated space on Main Street, the sophisticated atmosphere of the restaurant only enriches the taste of unique Thai dishes. Entrees range from $15-20.

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If you are looking for a romantic dinner or a high-end lunch, Angelina’s Ristorante Italiano is the place to go. The rich taste of beautifully crafted Italian food made from only the finest and freshest ingredients will treat your taste buds. As you dine, you can soak in the relaxing atmosphere of white painted brick walls illuminated by soft lighting and candlelight. Dinner Entrees range from $15-25.

 

Get a taste of Greece at the Gyro House. The menu has a wide variety of Greek foods, the featured item of course being the Gyros. The service is speedy and you can chose to eat in or grab something for the road. Prices range from $6-10, but every gyro comes complete with French fries inside the gyro.

 

For desert check out Aissa Sweets. Only a mile from Main Street, it sells pastries that are crafted using Middle Eastern cooking traditions. Founded by Ahmad Aissa, a Syrian native, and his wife Evelyn, Aissa Sweets known for its melt-in-your-mouth Baklava. These sweets are made in Concord but sold at farmers markets, fresh markets, and coops all over New England. When you go in the bakery on State Street, Ahmed and Evelyn are there to serve you.

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Concord is a testament to the statement that you don’t have to sacrifice access to delicious and diverse cuisine to experience the charm of a quintessential New England city.  http://www.concordnhchamber.com/visitor_info.html


Waterville Valley: Rising from the storm to be a mountain bike destination

Waterville Valley, NH --In 2011, Tropical Storm Irene swept through parts of New Hampshire and Vermont caring about little what stood in its way.  At the time, three years ago, there wasn’t much to do but stare at the damage and wonder where to begin cleaning up. What good could possibly come from such destruction?

For one group, though – in a sort of roundabout way – the storm provided a silver lining that, a couple years later, is being realized. Today, the mountain bike community in Waterville Valley and the surrounding area is discovering its size and strength. Its numbers are strong and growing. The least surprised by that? The mountain bike community itself. And, as the community grows, so does the Waterville Valley trail system.

Mountain-biker-flowers

 

Waterville Valley sits much like an island, surrounded on all side by over 700,000 acres of the White Mountain National Forest. Riding from an inn or lodge into the forest is easier than anywhere else in the North Country.  And as a valley, there are all kinds of trails to take on. Getting into the mountains from the valley floor is easy, thanks to a chairlift up Snow’s Mountain.

Nordic ski trails, logging roads, fire roads, and hiking trails wind throughout Waterville Valley to create more than 30 miles of mountain bike trails that read like the Boston MBTA map. Now, with a little help from Irene, add singletrack trails to that map.

For those not down with the mountain bike lingo, “singletrack” is just that; a trail wide enough for a single bike with a focus on weaving through trees, using natural terrain (stumps, roots, rocks) as obstacles, and creating a much more technical form of riding. At the same time, these trails call upon the rider’s creativity to maneuver around said obstacles.

According to Mike Furgal, treasurer of the Waterville Valley Foundation (a group dedicated to helping keep Waterville Valley unique and special), the 2011 tropical storm destroyed or damaged a significant amount of the bike trails.  The Greeley Ponds Trail, which connects the Valley to the Kancamagus Highway, was one of them. In an effort to restore the trail, the WVF began a fundraising campaign.  Twenty thousand dollars later, and the damaged trail is in the revitalization process.  Another benefit of the WVF campaign is that the mountain biking community became fully self-aware. 

“We came back and said, ‘Wow, people have an interest in doing large projects like this,’” Furgal said of the community effort to restore the trail. “Why don’t we see what kind of interest there might be to do something else, like adding singletrack trails.”

Surrounding trail systems had made similar plans work in the past, so Furgal and others presented a plan to the National Forest Foundation to build in some new trails on the existing system. Being met not with resistance but rather paper work and hoops to jump through to build on National Forest land, the group determined that it might be best to start building on private land.

The Waterville Company, master developer of Waterville Valley resort, stepped up to the plate and provided the land for the project.  Once that was in place, the plan took off.

“There was just a tsunami of events,” Bill Cantlin of the Waterville Company said. “But once the process was established it was remarkable to see the biking community come together to work on these trails.”

A group of mountain bikers out of the Plymouth, NH area decided to form a chapter of the New England Mountain Bike Association. Looking for a project to prove to the Forest Service that they could build sustainable trails, the group volunteered their time to help Furgal and Cantlin build the trails on Waterville Company's land.

“We were expecting just a couple of guys to show up when we began working on the trails,” Furgal said. “We had 16 guys show up one night, which was overwhelming, but just shows what kind of support was out there.”

It wasn’t long until there were two well crafted, singletrack trails, which are now easily accessed by the existing Waterville Valley trail system - a system that previously boasted quality biking at the extremes. There was little variety between the novice/beginner trails and their trails that could star in a Red Bull advertisement. With the addition of these new singletrack trails, which Cantlin and Furgal described as intermediate, Waterville Valley now has not only that middle ground in terms of terrain, but also a foundation from which to grow.

Despite currently only having just the couple of new trails, Will Ritchie, Manager at the Adventure Center in Waterville Valley's Town Square, sees that they offer much more than might meet the eye.

“No one trail is ridden the same way twice,” said Ritchie. “Depending on how you take the angle for each turn or how aggressively you want to take the trail or how fast you want to take it, singletrack is great because it’s always different. It allows you the opportunity to challenge yourself.”

These new trails are not currently labeled on the official trail map, but according to Ritchie and Furgal they’re easy to find (just off of Mike’s Dream).  If you’re renting a bike or interested in learning about the trails, the folks at the Adventure Center will gladly point out on a map where they are for you.

If you’re concerned about the quality of the new trails, the way Ritchie sees it, there’s nothing to worry about. Having little in the way of “official” singletrack trails in the area, local bikers, such as those that came together to build these new trails, have had to depend on their own ingenuity to build trails if they wanted anything to ride.

“These trails were built by people who have been doing it informally for quite some time,” Ritchie said. “They’re experienced trail builders. They know what they’re doing.”

These trail builders could also be key to moving forward as Furgal, Cantlin and Ritchie all hope and look forward to singletrack expansion. Having constructed in the past, these builders know the rules and regulations when it comes to crossing wetlands and chopping down brush and trees. And building in the National Forest will certainly come with its share of rules and regulations.

According to Furgal and Cantlin, because of the uncertainty and lengthy process of being able to cut trails through National Forest, the immediate plan will be to work with private land owners that have property that abuts existing trails, much in the same way the first two trails were built on the Waterville Company’s property. In the meantime, work can begin with the U.S. Forest Service to one day have these plans realized.

“Right now, we see these existing trails as a launch pad for the next five to 10 years down the road,” Furgal said.

And why should they not be? With somewhere in the neighborhood of 25,000 bike rentals a summer out of Ritchie’s shop alone, the sport and area has an audience with a wealth of interest.

And much like Irene, when communities, such as the bike community of the Waterville Valley area, have a like interest, there is little that can stop it. Learn more at www.visitwatervillevalley.com


White Mountains Adventure Getaway: Tram, Train & Trek with Adair Country Inn

 

 

BETHLEHEM, NH - Adventure awaits guests at one of the White Mountains' historic inns this Summer with a package that will take them to the summits of two peaks and into the rocky chasm of a third.

 

The Tram, Train & Trek experience is offered by the Adair Country Inn, which sits amidst 200 acres of private property near the crossroads of Interstate 93 and US Route 302, at Exit 40. The getaway features two tickets for two aboard the Cannon Mountain Aerial Tram and the Mount Washington Cog Railway, which climbs to the top of New England's highest peak. Rounding out the adventure is the trek through the Flume Gorge, part of the Franconia Notch State Park.

 

"These are three venerable attractions in the White Mountains and are all located within about 20 minutes from the Inn" said Kimberly Hunter, who, with her husband, Barry, is the innkeeper at the Adair. "Each one is a unique experience in its own right, but together, the add a sense of adventure for a couple on a Summer getaway."

 

With views of the Presidential Mountain Range and Franconia Notch, the Adair was built in 1927 by prominent Washington, DC attorney Frank Hogan for his only child, Dorothy Adair as a wedding present. Frequent guests at the home included politicians, sports figures of the day and even the Hollywood elite.

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After a day spent in the mountains, guests can wander the network of trails on the property and unwind in the lovely gardens, designed by noted landscape designers, the Olmsted Brothers.

 

Packages start at $249 per night (with a two night minimum) and include a gourmet candlelight breakfast each morning and afternoon tea. Travel dates extend to July 30th.

 

For more information and to book the Tram, Train & Trek package, visit www.adairinn.com or call 603-444-2600.

 

 

Three Cheers for the Red, White and Blue on July 4th in Waterville Valley

 

 

Waterville Valley, NH  – Celebrate America’s birthday with patriotic and family-friendly events in Waterville Valley this 4th of July.

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The weekend kicks off with an Independence Day Parade at 11 a.m. on Saturday, July 4th. Everyone is invited to participate by walking in the parade, helping with a float or entering their own. The parade will pass the Town Square where the Waterville Valley Recreation Department will host their annual Carnival from 12 noon to 4 p.m. There will be games, t-shirt tie-dyeing, a 100-foot obstacle course, bounce house, live music and more. Child wristbands are $10; children two and under are free. A free outdoor concert will start at 6:30 p.m. in Town Square, followed by a fireworks display at 9:30 p.m. Bring a blanket (and your family and friends) to enjoy the show.

 

More information is available by calling the Waterville Valley Recreation Department at (603) 236-4695.

 

Waterville Valley, New Hampshire’s family resort, was designed and planned as a self-contained, four-seasons destination in the White Mountain National Forest. Today, in addition to world-class ski area, Waterville Valley Resort has award-winning tennis courts, golf, hiking, biking, lodging, cultural activities and summer theater, an indoor ice rink, boating and a skate park. Dining options include both traditional favorites and elegant eateries. For more information, call 800-468-2553 or visit www.visitwatervillevalley.com.

 

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M/S Mount Washington Lobsterfests Bring Together Seafood & Sunsets

 

 

Weirs Beach, NH – Two great things about summer – Lake Winnipesaukee sunsets and lobster – come together during the Lobsterfest events aboard the M/S Mount Washington.

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Enjoy a sunset cruise around the lake while enjoying fresh Maine lobster, live music and dancing. Summer Lobsterfest cruises will take place on Friday, July 3; Friday, July 24 and Friday, August 7. There will also be autumn Lobsterfest cruises on Saturday, September 5 (from Weirs Beach, 6-9 p.m.) and Saturday, October 3 (from Weirs Beach, 5-8 p.m.). Tickets are $54 and include dinner and entertainment and barbecue chicken or a second entree option.

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The summer Lobsterfest cruises in July and August run for three hours and depart from Weirs Beach at 7 p.m. with a stop in Meredith to pick-up passengers at 7:30 p.m. Live entertainment will be provided on the Main Deck and in the Flagship Lounge.

 

The official 2015 daily cruising season for the M/S Mount Washington, and her sister vessels, runs from May 16 until October 18 offering daily cruises from its summer port of Weirs Beach and servicing the other ports of Alton Bay, Center Harbor, Meredith and Wolfeboro. Cruising times and options vary depending on the season with July and August having the most cruises available. Options include daily scenic, evening dinner dance and island mail delivery cruises. 

 

To learn more about the various vessels (Mount Washington, Doris E. & Sophie C.) and to view a more complete schedule with cruise times and ticket prices, visit www.cruisenh.com or call 603-366-5531.

 

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M/S Mount Washington Celebrates Independence Day with Annual Fireworks Party Cruise

 

Weirs Beach, NH – Celebrate Independence Day and enjoy fireworks displays over the lake during the M/S Mount Washington July 4th Fireworks Party Cruise. Every year, Lake Winnipesaukee community members create their own fireworks displays and M/S Mount Washington guests have the best vantage point to enjoy the show. 

Mount_From_Shore
 

The Fireworks Party Cruise on Saturday, July 4, features a delicious dinner buffet, live entertainment provided by well-known local favorite band, Annie and the Orphans, and a scenic three hour cruise. Tickets are $54 per person and guests under 21 are welcome, but must be accompanied by a parent or guardian. The ship departs Weirs Beach at 7 p.m. and returns around 10 p.m. after the Meredith fireworks. Advance tickets are recommended as this cruise usually sells out.  

 

The official 2015 daily cruising season for the M/S Mount Washington, and her sister vessels, runs from May 16 until October 18 offering daily cruises from its summer port of Weirs Beach and servicing the other ports of Alton Bay, Center Harbor, Meredith and Wolfeboro. Cruising times and options vary depending on the season with July and August having the most cruises available. Options include daily scenic, evening dinner dance and island mail delivery cruises. 

 

To learn more about the various vessels (Mount Washington, Doris E. & Sophie C.) and to view a more complete schedule with cruise times and ticket prices, visit www.cruisenh.com or call 603-366-5531.

 

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It’s All Included! Waterville Valley Offers Vacationers New Freedom Pass

Waterville Valley, NH – Vacationers at Waterville Valley Resort in New Hampshire’s White Mountains get to enjoy golf, tennis, canoeing & kayaking, mountain biking, chairlift rides, swimming and more. It’s all included with Waterville Valley’s new Freedom Pass.

 

Visitors to Waterville Valley can relax and unwind in a variety of lodging options, from spacious condominiums large enough for an entire family, to cozy country inns that are a perfect fit for incurable romantics. Upon checking in at their Waterville Valley lodge, guests are given a Freedom Pass – their passport to mountain fun and a savings of $100 per person, per day.

 

With the Freedom Pass guests have access to the White Mountain Athletic Club’s indoor and outdoor pools, whirlpools, saunas, steam rooms, indoor jogging track, and strength & cardio centers.

 

The Freedom Pass also entitles guests to one 2-hour standard mountain bike rental each day of their stay.  Waterville Valley is surrounded by 100 miles of off-road trails in the White Mountain National Forest making it the perfect destination for mountain biking and hiking enthusiasts. Use the pass to hit the links at the resort’s historic 9-hole golf course.  Play tennis on the 18 award-winning clay tennis courts. Rent a canoe, kayak, pedal boat or stand-up paddle board on the spring-fed pond.  Cool down at the indoor ice arena.  Don’t have skates?  Don’t worry!  Ice skate rentals are available for a small fee.

 

The Freedom Pass also provides admission to the resort’s Recreation Department gym programs as well as family story time at the Margret and H.A. Rey Center. The non-profit Rey Center is named for the authors of the popular Curious George books.  The Rey’s owned a home in Waterville Valley, which is now open to the public as the Curious George Cottage.  


Waterville Valley Resort offers something for everyone, whether you’re looking for relaxation and rejuvenation or active outdoor fun.

 

To learn more about the Freedom Pass benefits, schedules and offers go to http://www.visitwatervillevalley.com/#!play/c10mq

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Waterville Valley, New Hampshire’s family resort, was designed and planned as a self-contained, four-seasons destination in the White Mountain National Forest. Today, in addition to world-class ski area, Waterville Valley Resort has award-winning tennis courts, golf, hiking, biking, lodging, cultural activities and summer theater, an indoor ice rink, boating and a skate park. Dining options include both traditional favorites and elegant eateries. For more information, call 800-468-2553 or visit www.visitwatervillevalley.com.

 


Waterville Valley offers "Brazil in Waterville" Festival June 13-14

Brazilian Poster

Waterville Valley Resort will host its first ever “Brazil in Waterville” event on June 13th and 14th, 2015.   The event will feature Brazilian music, barbeque, and other Brazilian food and drink as well as activities.

The fun begins on Saturday at noon with a live concert in the Town Square featuring the "Brad Ricardo Pablo Trio" playing the best of Bossa Nova – a fusion of Samba and Jazz flute. Local restaurants will offer a traditional Brazilian churrasco-style barbecue in the Square. After barbecue, at 5:30 p.m., the 5-person Grupo Carmarote will fill the Square with Brazilian dance music from Forro to Samba.

On Sunday, Waterville Valley will offer a pick-up soccer games on the resort’s regulation-size soccer field, and children’s events will be offered during some games at the resort’s Recreation Department. Call the Rec Department of more info on programs (603) 236-4695.

“We enjoy having vacationing guests from all over; but we also get a lot of Brazilian guests. This is our way of sharing their culture, and thanking them for coming to our resort,” said Matthew Hesser, president of the Waterville Valley Resort Association.

The Brazil in Waterville Valley Package starts at $399, inclusive of tax and resort fees, for 2 nights’ accommodations, $100 in Festival Bucks to spend at participating Waterville Valley shops, restaurants, select Recreation Center Activities, and Freedom Pass Activities (valued at $100 per person, per day).

Waterville Valley, New Hampshire’s family resort, was designed and planned as a self-contained, four-seasons destination in the White Mountain National Forest. Today, in addition to world-class ski area, Waterville Valley Resort has award-winning tennis courts, golf, hiking, biking, lodging, cultural activities and summer theater, an indoor ice rink, boating and a skate park. Dining options include both traditional favorites and elegant eateries. For more information, call 800-468-2553 or visit www.visitwatervillevalley.com.